Archive for the ‘Paper’ Category

Super Fun Summertime Product Update!

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

We’ve started getting a taste of spring and summer in the shop lately with some fun new products! They’re sure to make your dreams of summer picnics a reality!

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New notebooks, pencils, popsicle shaped birthday cards, as well as our selection of Rifle Iphone cases are all available in store.

Also, fun new summertime sheets of wrap!

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Come in and check it out! Get summer started early.

-Emily 


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For those that need to get away

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

I was recently fortunate enough to escape a few weeks of this cold Canadian winter on a trip to Costa Rica. Upon returning I found I had travel on the brain more than ever and found myself gravitating towards items in the store that reflected my nomadic spirit.

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We have a multitude of products in store to appeal to those looking to travel or interested in geography. Everything from travel journals, notecards, stickers, maps, and papers that depict patterns from around the globe.

jm-for-blog-450x257I found I was especially drawn to our patterned wave and botanical Chiyogami, Zuiun, and Shibori Handmade Japanese decorative papers. I found it hard to look at them and not see swirling sand, tropical plants, and the beautiful gradients of the sunsets I had watched in the prior weeks. For those that scrapbook or create photo albums after travel be sure to browse through our binders in store because you may find treasures like these papers that you never knew about before.

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Scratching off Costa Rica on our display interactive Scratch Map by Luckies of London ($29.95) was one of the first things I did upon arrival back to the store. These maps are a great way of tracking where you’ve been and where you want to go next. Travel aficionados feel free to make your mark on our map next time you’re in store to share where you’ve been. I know I can’t wait to be able to scratch more destinations off.

-Justine

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Candy/Treasure/Secret Gift Boxes

Friday, January 30th, 2015

I love boxes! Wooden boxes, porcelain boxes, clay boxes, cardboard boxes. Even if they’re empty, I just love their potential to hold something old or new, something edible or something forever. And they are logical, symmetrical and perfectly constructed. I used to make these kinds of templates in technical drawing class, so they appeal to the younger me too.

In time for Valentine’s Day, we are stocking three different types of gift box templates so that you can make your own to present to that someone special in your life. Naturally then, I couldn’t resist trying out some different paper and card combos on these boxes.

Papers, cardstocks and tools for making out gift boxes.

Papers, cardstocks and tools for making out gift boxes.

For the five I made for this week’s blog, I chose the following:

– Petite Gift Box Template with Heart Topper ($9.95)
– Heart Gift Box Template ($8.95)
– Square Gift Box Template ($7.95)
– Vellum (8.5″ x 11″, $0.75 per sheet or $13.95 per 25 sheet pack)
– Glassine Frost (27″ x 39″, $2.50)
– Ito-iri White Weave Japanese paper (8.5″ x 11″, $1.20)
– Gira Pearl Coral Heavy WNP paper (8.5″ x 11″, $1.10)
– Mokume Japanese paper (8.5″ x 11″, $0.90)
– Antique Gold WNP paper (8.5″ x 11″, $0.85)
– Double-sided crate paper (12″ x 12″, black & white heart/stripes, $2.50)
– Double-sided crate paper (12″ x 12″, playtime/floral, $2.50)
– 4” bone folder ($6.95)
– Scalpel knife or scissors ($5.95 or $5.95)
– HB pencil
– glue stick ($5.95)

The gift boxes assembled. Clockwise from top: double-sided cardstock/crate paper; Antique Gold & Mokume; Vellum & Glassine Frost; Gira Pearl Coral Heavy cardstock & Ito-iri White Weave and (centre) double-sided cardstock/crate paper.

The gift boxes assembled. Clockwise from top: double-sided cardstock/crate paper; Antique Gold & Mokume; Vellum & Glassine Frost; Gira Pearl Coral Heavy cardstock & Ito-iri White Weave and (centre) double-sided cardstock/crate paper.

I chose to put the Vellum and the Glassine Frost, the Ito-iri White Weave and the Gira Pearl Coral and the Mokume, and the Antique Gold together to create boxes with an internal and an external appeal. I chose the Mokume and the Ito-iri White Weave in particular for their wood and fabric aspects respectively. I glued these sheets together using the glue stick and then simply traced around my chosen template with the pencil. Don’t forget to trace the slits which will allow the heart-topped box to close. The crate paper is already double-sided so you can choose which side you want to face out!

Then I just cut out the trace, using the scissors in a slow, fluid way to get the curves really curvy. Once cut out, I used the scalpel knife to cut out the slits. I also used the back of the scalpel knife to score along the folds (along the base of the heart-topped box and the sides of the heart-shaped box) although I think the bone folder itself would have been enough to do this. It is nice when a box has bends but not super-defined corners.

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The boxes filled with Mendiant chocolates and M&Ms!

Then, carefully, I folded the boxes into their respective shapes. This is best done slowly and gently so as not to tear the more delicate parts of the box (flaps etc). After that I only had to choose what to put into them. Mendiant chocolates had just arrived from my brother and his family in France and I always have M&Ms just lying around!

These boxes, especially ones made from one of our cardstocks, are perfect for sweets, pieces of jewellery or love messages. They are a breeze to to make and the paper or card you choose is guaranteed to put your own personal mark on them.

 

Aoife

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Paper Covered Nightstand

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Hi all! This week, I decided to tackle one of those I’ve-been-meaning-to-get-around-to-it-for-ages projects that has been plaguing our apartment for the 3 years we’ve lived there.

We all have pieces of furniture that we inherited when we were students, or got from that friend of a friend and just never got rid of. For my boyfriend and I, it was our nightstands…

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These very boring, very scratched, very faded nightstands have floated around with us every time we’ve moved, and are currently occupying space on either side of the bed. They add nothing to the room, and it’s high time these babies got some serious DIY love.

I’m not a huge fan of painting furniture. I am an inherently messy person (a.k.a. there’s always paint everywhere) and the paint never ends up looking as good as I want it to. Enter the beautiful black and white Scalloped Nepalese Paper (only $5.00 for a 20×30 sheet!).

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 Both my boyfriend and I love this patterned paper, and I’ve been looking for a use for it ever since I purchased it, and I thought this would be the perfect opportunity. And so we arrive at the title “Paper Covered Nightstand”.

This DIY is relatively simple and quick (it only took me 2 hours) and requires minimal equipment:

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-Screwdriver
-Patterned Paper (enough to cover the surface area of the doors and drawer faces)
-Xacto Knife
-Large Cutting Mat (not pictured)
-Neutral PH Adhesive or PVA glue (available in store for $11.95)
-Glue Brush (only $1.50 in store!)
-Bone folder (also available in store for $9.95)

Step 1:
Use the screwdriver to remove the doors and drawer faces of your nightstand. Give them a wipe with some warm soapy water to give the paper a clean surface to stick to, and dry them thoroughly.

Step 2:
Using your Xacto, trim the first sheet of paper around your door, leaving about 2″ of overhang (if you have very thick doors, you might need more overhang and thinner doors will need less).

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Step 3: Pour the glue directly onto the surface of the door (this will prevent it from drying too quickly) and spread it with the brush to coat the surface evenly. Making sure the paper’s pattern is lined up straight, lay it down on the door, and press down firmly. Hold the bone folder sideways and use it to smooth out any creases or air bubbles that form.

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Step 4: Lift up the edges of your paper and add glue to any areas you may have missed, then go over the edges with the bone folder to make sure they’re firmly glued down. If your door has a beveled detail, like mine does, run the bone folder along the bevel so the paper sits flush in the crease.

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Step 5: Poke a screw or the screw driver through any holes you need for hardware. It is important to do this while the glue is wet because it will plasticize when it dries and fill the hole, and you don’t want to have to drill a new one.

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Step 6: Carefully flip the door over so that you are now looking at the inside and the 2″ paper overhang. With the Xacto knife, make two cuts at the paper’s corner, one straight and one diagonally, to create a right triangle. Do the same thing to the adjacent corner, making sure the triangles mirror each other (the 2 straight edges should be paralell). Repeat the process on the other side of the door, and when you’re done, you should have 2 straight flaps, and 2 trapezoidal flaps (see below).

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Step 7: Brush glue onto the edge of the door adjacent to one of the trapezoidal flaps, and carefully fold the flap over, going over the edge with the bone folder. Lift the paper and glue down any sections you missed. Repeat this process on the opposite edge. If you get glue on part of the door that’s not covered by paper, don’t worry! Just wipe it with some warm water while its still wet.

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Step 8: Brush glue to the edge of the door below one of the overhanging corners. Carefully tuck the edge of the corner in on itself, then cover it with the remaining paper (see below). This process gives you a neat, hospital corner, and guarantees that no white will peak through your paper. Repeat this step on all 4 corners.

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Step 9: Apply glue to one of the remaining edges and fold over the rectangular flap, going over the edge with your bone folder. Lift the paper and apply glue to any spots you missed, pressing down firmly, and wiping any excess glue with warm water. Repeat the process on the last remaining edge.

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Step 10: With your knife and screwdriver, carefully cut and poke the holes needed for your hardware while the glue is still wet. When you’re done, set this door aside to dry, and repeat steps 1-10 on the remaining door and drawer faces.

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When you’re finished and all the pieces have dried, put the hardware back on and reattach them to the body of your nightstand. Now it’s time to stand back and admire your handiwork!

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I’m super happy with how this project turned out. My only problem now is restraining myself from covering every piece of furniture in our apartment! It’s very addicting…

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Good luck with all your paper DIYs!

Cheers!
Emma

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Creative party planning: NYE Photo booth

Saturday, January 3rd, 2015

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A photo booth can be a really fun way to provide a platform for guests to capture memories at parties or events. This past New Years Eve I decided to construct one at a friend’s masquerade party using some curtains, some paper and a few of our remaining holiday decorations.

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I strung up our Meri Meri Pop diamond boxes and Meri Meri Pinwheels ($22.95) using our Knot and Bow Cotton twine ($9.95) to create some 3-dimensional details in the foreground and used the gold string that came with the diamond boxes with long strips of some of our metallic papers to create a garland for the backdrop. The strips were cut from our Metal Momi and Metal Midare papers which are very sturdy and luminous and looked great with their varying textures.

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Guests of the party had a lot of fun using the photo booth to take portraits as everyone awaited midnight. Most of the masks we had were purchased from Malabar, however friends Tom and Ainslie impressed everyone with their custom deer and fox paper masks from Wintercroft. Wintercroft offers really interesting geometric pattern mask templates that are easily downloaded off of their website, printed, and constructed out of 8 1/2 x 11 paper. Can you imagine how great some of these masks would look made from our Chiyogami paper?

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We have a variety of ever changing party decorations just like these at our store so come in and stock up so you’re more equipped for your next party.

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-Justine

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