Archive for the ‘The Paper Place’ Category

Hand Stitched Pamphlet DIY

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Hi all!

Emma here. I’m very excited because next week I’m instructing our Hand Stitched Collage Journal workshop here in the store! Bookbinding can sometimes be a tricky business, and there are a lot of steps that need to be followed. So I’m making an instructional pamphlet for everyone to refer to during the workshop, and take home at the end.

Hand stitched pamphlets look really impressive and are super easy to make, so I thought I’d share a quick guide on how to sew one!

First, you want to layout all your pages. If you’re doing a double sided pamphlet like I did, this can feel a little weird because the layouts tends to look backwards. The trick is to count how many pages you have, then find your 2 middle pages, because these will be facing each other, and will therefore be printed on the same sheet of paper (I had 8 pages, so my middle pages were 4 & 5). Then, work backwards from there. If your middle pages are 4 & 5, then the back of that page is 3 & 6.

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Once you have the pages laid out, print or photocopy them so they’re double sided. You can also make a separate cover in a different colour if you want to get really fancy!

Now it’s time to assemble your pamphlet. Put all the sheets together in order, and fold them in half. I used a bone folder to get a really nice crease (available in store for $9.95).

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Next, I created a template with 3 holes in it: One in the centre, one near the top and one near the bottom (the last two should be equidistant from the centre).

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Put the template in the middle of your pamphlet and punch the same three holes through your pages. Measure out your thread (2x the length of your spine) and thread your needle. I really love sewing with the waxed linen thread we have in the store (20 yards of 2-ply for only $4.50!). The waxy coating helps ensure you don’t rip through the paper you’re sewing.

Begin sewing in the centre hole, leaving a 1″ piece outside your pamphlet. Sew back out the top hole, then all the way to the bottom hole. When your pulling your stitches tight, make sure to gently pull parallel to the spine to further prevent ripping. Resurface through the middle hole and tie the two ends together.

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And voila! This is one of the easiest forms of a book to make, and I love making little pamphlet books for my family and friends. Come check out our enormous in store selection of 8.5 x 11 papers, perfect for pamphlet making!

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Happy weekend!

Emma

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Canadiana Stitched Pamphlet

Monday, December 8th, 2014

With my background in publishing, I jumped at the chance to make a book for this week’s blog post. And being new to Canada (moving from Ireland to Toronto last April), I’m also still enjoying the honeymoon phase with all things Canadiana. The Canadian flag, designed by George Stanley in 1964 to be ‘instantly recognizable, and simple enough so that school children could draw it’, lends itself to tweaks and manipulation in a way that only a handful of national ensigns do.

1. Stitched pamphlet  Cover to Cover[7]

Pamphlet stitch, p. 21 of Sheena LaPlantz’ Cover to Cover ($19.95)

2. Stitched pamphlet tools[10]

Tools for making a stitched pamphlet


Using Sheena LaPlantz’ book, Cover to Cover: creative techniques for making beautiful books, journals & albums, as my guide, I set about making a very simple 16-page stitched pamphlet, using Japanese ivory linen cardstock and red WNP cardstock for the cover and ivory WNP text paper for the pages inside. After cutting all sheets in half (lengthways), I took a further 1″ off the width of the ivory linen (so that it’s shorter than the red cardstock) and roughly 1/4″ off the width and the height of the ivory text (so that it’s tucked inside the pamphlet).

3. Stitched pamphlet stitch[9]

Finishing the very, very simple stitch


I positioned the first hole I made with the awl exactly in the centre of the crease and the second and third holes (above and below the first), I positioned 3/4″ from the top and bottom of the signature. The book binding tape is just over 1″ wide and I cut each strip (3 in total) to a length of 4¾″. I snipped a 1/4″ into either end of each strip so that it would fold into the pamphlet, on either side of the spine.

 

4. Stitched pamphlet reindeer wood shape[7]

Reindeer face wood shape ($1.00) used as an outline on the red text weight paper


And for the central image of the cover, I couldn’t resist the wooden holiday shapes, choosing the reindeer face to replace the customary maple leaf. Using a light pencil, I traced around the shape on the red cardstock and then cut it out carefully using a small scissors. I glued her to the front of the pamphlet using one of our small rice glue sticks.

5. Canadiana reindeer stitched pamphlet[4]

The finished, 16-page, stitched pamphlet


I set myself the task of making a stitched pamphlet which would give a respectful and humorous nod to my new habitat. I hope you like it as much as I do! Now I just have to decide who to send it to . . .

Aoife

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Batik Window Covering

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

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We recently moved into a main-floor apartment and couldn’t be happier, having said that, our bedroom window looks directly onto our shared porch. We needed at least a bit of privacy from the neighbourhood, and we needed it on a budget.

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A couple of sheets of batik print nepalese paper and a tube of rice paste later and we were ready to begin our privacy screen. We applied the paste directly to the paper, starting from the centre and working our way out to the edges. After coating the pages, we applied them to the window panes.

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Once applied, we needed to work out any air bubbles. For this we used a tiny squeegee, but a credit card would work just as well. The paste works well here because it gave us a bit of time to move the paper around and find the best edges. After giving it a couple of minutes to set, we went to work with a utility knife and cleaned up the edges. The end result was exactly what we needed, a privacy screen that also lets through a lovely amount of light.

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Have fun with it,

Michael

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Adventures in Marbling

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

Like many others this past long weekend I was fortunate enough to escape the city and get back to nature at a friend’s cottage. I knew going up there that it would be the perfect environment to do some material exploration so I brought along with me our Suminagashi Marbling kit and decided to try my hand at some floating ink marbling.

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Our store owner Heather had created some really beautiful samples using our Usu Kuchi Heavy, so I brought some of that along with me as well to test out along with a couple of sheets of our wood veneer. Being someone who enjoys working with natural and found materials I also harvested some birch bark from the woods surrounding the cottage to experiment with.

 

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Heather’s marbling samples using the Suminagashi Marbling kit and Usu Kuchi Heavy.

 

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The marbling kit works by filling a clean shallow pan with water and then dropping the high-grade cosmetic pigment ink onto a small circle of float paper that helps keep them on the surface. The ink can then be swirled and manipulated using a stick or your finger before you place the material (paper, cloth, hide, wood, etc) face down on the ink to let it sink in.

 

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I’ll admit that my first time cottage attempts at marbling didn’t turn out as well as Heather’s samples, but the process of doing it was really fun and I found the contrast of the bright marbled ink on the natural birch to be a really interesting juxtaposition even though the details of the marble didn’t come through as strongly as I had hoped.

 

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My first attempts on paper and wood veneer (which be warned, will curl in the water, but really soaks up the ink nicely).

 

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As far as cottage activities go the Marbling kit was both relaxing and meditative and fun to share with my friends. I can see it being both a great tool for artists wishing to create their own one of a kind patterned paper and a fun activity for kids to experiment with during craft time (the inks are non-toxic so safe for kids 6 and above to use). I’m definitely looking forward to more adventures in marbling and have a newfound appreciation for artists such as Robert Wu, whose prints we carry and sell in store, who have clearly mastered the technique.

– Justine

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Huge Sale This Weekend on Selected Chiyogami Patterns

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

This weekend, in store only, we have selected Chiyogami patterns on sale like you will never see again!!! Over 70 patterns! Full sheets, normally $16 per sheet, are on sale for $9 or the price of a regular half sheet. Sat, August 16th from 10am-6pm and Sun, August 17th from 12-5pm. See you here!!!

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