Christmas Tree Light Garland

December 11th, 2014

I love Christmas and I love Christmas crafting projects.  There’s no better time to start something than when it’s cold and snowy out.  If you’re like me there’s always a trade off between practicality and holiday festivities if you live in a small space.  I love real trees, but unfortunately I don’t really have room for one.  This year I decided to put my tree on the wall!  Seen here with the Christmas garland I made last year.

light garland tree

I cut the lights from four different coloured cardstocks we carry and added the end bits out of our Titanium cardstock.  I used about one 8.5×11″ size sheet for each colour .  I strung them on our twine and topped it with one of our great Dresden Trim stars.  I used washi tape to hang it up on the wall.

close up

The perfect thing if you don’t have any floor space to spare.

Jax

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Canadiana Stitched Pamphlet

December 8th, 2014

With my background in publishing, I jumped at the chance to make a book for this week’s blog post. And being new to Canada (moving from Ireland to Toronto last April), I’m also still enjoying the honeymoon phase with all things Canadiana. The Canadian flag, designed by George Stanley in 1964 to be ‘instantly recognizable, and simple enough so that school children could draw it’, lends itself to tweaks and manipulation in a way that only a handful of national ensigns do.

1. Stitched pamphlet  Cover to Cover[7]

Pamphlet stitch, p. 21 of Sheena LaPlantz’ Cover to Cover ($19.95)

 

2. Stitched pamphlet tools[10]

Tools for making a stitched pamphlet


Using Sheena LaPlantz’ book, Cover to Cover: creative techniques for making beautiful books, journals & albums, as my guide, I set about making a very simple 16-page stitched pamphlet, using Japanese ivory linen cardstock and red WNP cardstock for the cover and ivory WNP text paper for the pages inside. After cutting all sheets in half (lengthways), I took a further 1″ off the width of the ivory linen (so that it’s shorter than the red cardstock) and roughly 1/4″ off the width and the height of the ivory text (so that it’s tucked inside the pamphlet).

3. Stitched pamphlet stitch[9]

Finishing the very, very simple stitch


I positioned the first hole I made with the awl exactly in the centre of the crease and the second and third holes (above and below the first), I positioned 3/4″ from the top and bottom of the signature. The book binding tape is just over 1″ wide and I cut each strip (3 in total) to a length of 4¾″. I snipped a 1/4″ into either end of each strip so that it would fold into the pamphlet, on either side of the spine.

 

4. Stitched pamphlet reindeer wood shape[7]

Reindeer face wood shape ($1.00) used as an outline on the red text weight paper


And for the central image of the cover, I couldn’t resist the wooden holiday shapes, choosing the reindeer face to replace the customary maple leaf. Using a light pencil, I traced around the shape on the red cardstock and then cut it out carefully using a small scissors. I glued her to the front of the pamphlet using one of our small rice glue sticks.

5. Canadiana reindeer stitched pamphlet[4]

The finished, 16-page, stitched pamphlet


I set myself the task of making a stitched pamphlet which would give a respectful and humorous nod to my new habitat. I hope you like it as much as I do! Now I just have to decide who to send it to . . .

Aoife

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Extended Holiday Hours starting today!

December 8th, 2014

Please refer to our handy Holiday hours calendar to see when we are open during the month of December!

dec2014hours_web

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Kraft Paper Party

November 21st, 2014

Guys, I have  confession… I love kraft paper. Probably more than anyone should, really. I love drawing on it, wrapping with it, decorating with it… And here at The Paper Place, we have a plethora of super cool paper products that really do capture that “paper bag” aesthetic that is so on trend right now.

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I used some of these products at a family birthday party recently, and let me tell you, they looked fantastic.

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On the table as a runner is one of our decorative kraft rolls (this one is called “French Receipts”). It not only looks fantastic, but it makes cleaning up super easy. Just pick it up and throw it away! No washing required.

IMG_2404I also used the DIY shop pennant banner to create some custom decor for the occasion. People were pretty impressed at our personalized banner, and all I used was a sharpie!

IMG_2407I guess all I’m trying to say here is, give kraft paper a chance! It’s simple and versatile and works for any occasion. And stop by The Paper Place to see more fun kraft paper products! Hope to see you soon!

 

 

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Batik Window Covering

November 5th, 2014

photo1

We recently moved into a main-floor apartment and couldn’t be happier, having said that, our bedroom window looks directly onto our shared porch. We needed at least a bit of privacy from the neighbourhood, and we needed it on a budget.

photo2

A couple of sheets of batik print nepalese paper and a tube of rice paste later and we were ready to begin our privacy screen. We applied the paste directly to the paper, starting from the centre and working our way out to the edges. After coating the pages, we applied them to the window panes.

photo3

 

Once applied, we needed to work out any air bubbles. For this we used a tiny squeegee, but a credit card would work just as well. The paste works well here because it gave us a bit of time to move the paper around and find the best edges. After giving it a couple of minutes to set, we went to work with a utility knife and cleaned up the edges. The end result was exactly what we needed, a privacy screen that also lets through a lovely amount of light.

photo4

 

Have fun with it,

Michael

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