Canadiana Stitched Pamphlet

December 8th, 2014

With my background in publishing, I jumped at the chance to make a book for this week’s blog post. And being new to Canada (moving from Ireland to Toronto last April), I’m also still enjoying the honeymoon phase with all things Canadiana. The Canadian flag, designed by George Stanley in 1964 to be ‘instantly recognizable, and simple enough so that school children could draw it’, lends itself to tweaks and manipulation in a way that only a handful of national ensigns do.

1. Stitched pamphlet  Cover to Cover[7]

Pamphlet stitch, p. 21 of Sheena LaPlantz’ Cover to Cover ($19.95)

2. Stitched pamphlet tools[10]

Tools for making a stitched pamphlet


Using Sheena LaPlantz’ book, Cover to Cover: creative techniques for making beautiful books, journals & albums, as my guide, I set about making a very simple 16-page stitched pamphlet, using Japanese ivory linen cardstock and red WNP cardstock for the cover and ivory WNP text paper for the pages inside. After cutting all sheets in half (lengthways), I took a further 1″ off the width of the ivory linen (so that it’s shorter than the red cardstock) and roughly 1/4″ off the width and the height of the ivory text (so that it’s tucked inside the pamphlet).

3. Stitched pamphlet stitch[9]

Finishing the very, very simple stitch


I positioned the first hole I made with the awl exactly in the centre of the crease and the second and third holes (above and below the first), I positioned 3/4″ from the top and bottom of the signature. The book binding tape is just over 1″ wide and I cut each strip (3 in total) to a length of 4¾″. I snipped a 1/4″ into either end of each strip so that it would fold into the pamphlet, on either side of the spine.

 

4. Stitched pamphlet reindeer wood shape[7]

Reindeer face wood shape ($1.00) used as an outline on the red text weight paper


And for the central image of the cover, I couldn’t resist the wooden holiday shapes, choosing the reindeer face to replace the customary maple leaf. Using a light pencil, I traced around the shape on the red cardstock and then cut it out carefully using a small scissors. I glued her to the front of the pamphlet using one of our small rice glue sticks.

5. Canadiana reindeer stitched pamphlet[4]

The finished, 16-page, stitched pamphlet


I set myself the task of making a stitched pamphlet which would give a respectful and humorous nod to my new habitat. I hope you like it as much as I do! Now I just have to decide who to send it to . . .

Aoife

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Extended Holiday Hours starting today!

December 8th, 2014

Please refer to our handy Holiday hours calendar to see when we are open during the month of December!

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Kraft Paper Party

November 21st, 2014

Guys, I have  confession… I love kraft paper. Probably more than anyone should, really. I love drawing on it, wrapping with it, decorating with it… And here at The Paper Place, we have a plethora of super cool paper products that really do capture that “paper bag” aesthetic that is so on trend right now.

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I used some of these products at a family birthday party recently, and let me tell you, they looked fantastic.

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On the table as a runner is one of our decorative kraft rolls (this one is called “French Receipts”). It not only looks fantastic, but it makes cleaning up super easy. Just pick it up and throw it away! No washing required.

IMG_2404I also used the DIY shop pennant banner to create some custom decor for the occasion. People were pretty impressed at our personalized banner, and all I used was a sharpie!

IMG_2407I guess all I’m trying to say here is, give kraft paper a chance! It’s simple and versatile and works for any occasion. And stop by The Paper Place to see more fun kraft paper products! Hope to see you soon!

 

 

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Batik Window Covering

November 5th, 2014

photo1

We recently moved into a main-floor apartment and couldn’t be happier, having said that, our bedroom window looks directly onto our shared porch. We needed at least a bit of privacy from the neighbourhood, and we needed it on a budget.

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A couple of sheets of batik print nepalese paper and a tube of rice paste later and we were ready to begin our privacy screen. We applied the paste directly to the paper, starting from the centre and working our way out to the edges. After coating the pages, we applied them to the window panes.

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Once applied, we needed to work out any air bubbles. For this we used a tiny squeegee, but a credit card would work just as well. The paste works well here because it gave us a bit of time to move the paper around and find the best edges. After giving it a couple of minutes to set, we went to work with a utility knife and cleaned up the edges. The end result was exactly what we needed, a privacy screen that also lets through a lovely amount of light.

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Have fun with it,

Michael

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Printed Washi Cards

October 29th, 2014

I recently went on a family vacation to Quito and the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador.  It was truly an amazing experience.  Everything was so beautiful.  Using some of the papers from our Natural Washi Sampler (available instore) I printed out some of the pictures I took. I then mounted them on the Photo Frame Die-Cut Cards we carry instore (8 cards and 8 matching envelopes to a pack).  A perfect way to send out some easy cards when all you wanna do is recover.

Packs

I was able to get some great results printing on the Washi, but I would always test print before committing to any paper.  Every printer is different so it’s hard to say what will work best for you and your project.  The Natural Washi Sampler is great to play around printing with because they’re already cut to 8.5×11″ sheets.  If you wanted to test out different papers, than are in the sampler, you could always cut them down yourself as well.

Cards 1

I printed a picture from the Cloud Forest in Mindo on the Gampi Smooth (left) and of Darwin’s Lake in Targus Cove on Isabela Island on Kozuke (right).  I loved the texture the fleck in the Gampi Smooth gave the picture of the forest floor.  I really wanted to work the beautiful nature of the paper into each picture.

Back Detail

On the back side of the print you can see the natural fleck in the paper a little better.  I thought this would be a great pairing and add another layer to the photo.

Cards 2

I think the thing I loved the most was the Lava Fields, there was so much raw texture everywhere you looked.  I printed a picture of the Lava Fields on Santiago Island on Usu Kuchi Heavy (left) and Elizabeth Bay on Isabela Island on Sekishu Tsuru Large (right).  The photos almost look three dimensional printed on the light paper and then mounted on the cards.  Again you can see the natural fibre inclusion in the clouds (right picture).

Hope your printing projects work just as well as mine did!

Jax

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