Posts Tagged ‘konnyaku’

Living with Washi – June Workshops

Friday, April 22nd, 2011

In conjunction with The Japanese Paper Place’s Living with Washi: Japanese Paper Inspiring Daily Life we will be running a series of Washi inspired workshops through the month of June!

Paper Covered Lamps
Tuesday June 7th, 2011 – 6:30-8:30pm
$60

The Japanese decorative papers that we are famous for are transformed by light. Subtle textures and under layed colours are revealed when they are illuminated. Each participant will receive a glass lamp to cover and access to a variety of fine Japanese decorative papers and tissues. Explore the possibilities of illuminated collage work while learning the technique of adhering paper to glass.

Papercut for Home Décor
Tuesday June 14th, 2011 – 6:30-8:30pm
$45

Join us for an evening as we take the mystery out of paper cutting. Learn to draw and pull 3-dimensional forms out of paper with a craft knife. You will be inspired to create forms for use in all kinds of home décor

Chiyogami Bijou
Tuesday June 21st, 2011 – 6:30-8:30pm
$40

Dive into our secret stash of off-cuts to create unique jewelry pieces out of Japanese Chiyogami paper. You will have fun experimenting with glass mounted paper pendants, paper covered wooden bangles, broaches, and lacquered origami pieces.

Konnyaku
Tuesday June 28th, 2011 – 6:30-8:30pm
$55

Best known in Japan as a food, konnyaku – or Devil’s Tongue Root starch – has also been used for centuries to make kamiko (paper clothing). Applied to washi paper and worked in by hand, this starch allows you to add wonderful textures, strength and durability. Papers treated with konnyaku can be used to make momigami for use in book covers and other projects where tough paper is needed. They are also suitable for stitching and dyeing. In this workshop you will learn the preparation of konnyaku, techniques for applying starch to a variety of papers, as well as be inspired by examples of what creative projects become possible with momigami.

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Don’t forget, there’s still room left in our spring workshops, hurry to sign up before they go!

 

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Seichosen Kozo

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

From now on, I will be posting regular blogs featuring our papers that we love the most.  I thought that it would be appropriate, for the first post, to feature the paper that I use in my own artwork.

Seichosen Kozo (Long) 25.5″ x 70.5″


Seichosen Kozo is made from 100% Japanese Kozo. The fibre is soaked & sun-bleached in pools of water created in a stream outside the papermaking studio. The kozo is then cooked in slaked lime which makes a softer, less shiny paper than fibre cooked in wood ash or soda ash. The sheets are formed on reed screens (rather than the usual bamboo) and are dried in the open air on wooden boards.


All of this is still carried out by the three generations of the Ozaki family in their mountain home in Kochi.  Kochi has long been known for rice cultivation and the farmers would make paper for their livelihood during the winter months.  The Ozaki’s are the last of these paper makers. (information courtesy of The Japanese Paper Place and Hiromi Paper International.)

The photo above is of the most recent mountain of hand-dyed papers in my studio.  I am preparing for my next piece in a new series.  After dyeing I treat each piece with konnyaku and then meticulously cut into 1.5″ squares.

Two pieces from my last series were just hung in the store today!  If you are passing by on Queen Street come in for a peak to see these in person.

Raspberries, 2010Kudzu, 2010

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“Sown In Washi” – a new series of artwork by Judith Rudoler

Friday, October 8th, 2010

“Sown In Washi”
by Judith Rudoler

on display
at the artist’s studio every
Sunday in November!

198 Walnut Avenue, Unit #9
(south of Queen Street at Trinity Bellwoods, behind The Paper Place)

Opening Reception
Thursday, October 28th
8pm

Artist Statement:

Everything I do starts with paper.  Currently, my work ends with stitched-paper collage. In between, however, are many hours of handling, preparing, and manipulating paper, my raw material.  My work uses Washi, a handmade, pure fibre, Japanese paper, a traditional handicraft whose industry is slowly dying and methods are being lost.

My process begins with the finest kozo Washi.  Each sheet is divided and then dyed according to my mood and the requirements for the desired final piece.  Bowls of pigmented water prepared, I then work the dyes into paper creating layers of colour.  Once dyed I use konnyaku, a starch derived from Devil’s Tongue Root, to further strengthen the paper and create texture.  Best known in Japan as an edible product, konnyaku, is also traditionally used to make kamiko, paper clothing.  The fragility of untreated washi contrasted with the strength of the treated product makes this part of the process most satisfying.  Upon completion I am presented with a world of possibilities, dozens of differently textured and coloured sheets of paper hanging to dry in anticipation of the final piece.

Each piece itself is born of an idea, a photograph, or a drawing that I manipulate in Adobe Photoshop.  For this series my subject is the urban garden.  I transform the image into a map that will guide me to cut and then stitch each fragment of paper into a final piece.  Individually altered papers cut and torn asunder, later to be reassembled results in a patchwork of colour and texture. For this I use my old Bernina sewing machine. The final piece is paper and thread.  It is, however, much more.  It is also a love of the colour palette, of light, and of texture.  The process takes me from handmade paper, upon which a series of treatments have been applied by hand, into a digital environment and then out again.  The final piece exhibits the aesthetics of both worlds: at once distinctly traditional and modern.

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How to Make Your Own Japanese Paper Wallet

Monday, June 14th, 2010
Paper Wallet and Business Card Holder

Paper Wallet and Business Card Holder

Japanese paper is surprisingly strong!  It is a fantastic paper to use when making your own paper wallet or business card holder.  Here is how to do it.

Supplies you will need

Supplies you will need

Some supplies you will need are:  decorative paper, solid colour paper, utility knife, ruler, paste, bone folder (not pictured) and konnyaku starch, mixing jar and brush (optional).

I chose to konnyaku the paper for my wallets before hand.  Konnyaku is a starch processed from the tuberous root of the devil’s tongue plant and is used in many food products in Japan. It has also been used for centuries to coat papers for use in making kamiko (paper clothing).  Paper treated with konnyaku becomes much stronger, water resistant and more flexible.  This step is optional but will help your wallet last longer.  Directions for mixing and application can be found with the konnyaku starch label.

Paper pieces cut to size

Paper pieces cut to size

Start by cutting all your pieces to size with a utility knife and ruler.  You should have decorative paper for the outside roughly 25.5cm x 12.5cm, as well as two pieces of decorative paper 12cm x 4 cm.  The two pieces of solid paper you will need should measure 27cm x 9.5cm and 8cm x 9.5 cm.

Scored pieces ready to assemble

Scored pieces ready to assemble

Next use your bone folder to pre-score the folding points.  On the outside decorative paper score a border all around the edge of the paper that measues 1cm wide.  To help reduce bulk at the corners when folded, cut off the corner points of the paper at a 45 degree angle.  Next, starting from inside your scored border, measure and score a line at 4.5cm and 19cm.  On the solid interior paper score a line at 11cm , 17.5cm and 23.5cm.  The smaller inside piece just gets folded in half on the 8cm side.

Gluing down the first interior section

Gluing down the first interior section

Now it is time to start gluing and assembling.  First start by folding the two small decorative pieces in half on the 12cm side and glue down.  You are left with two double sided pieces measuring 6cm x 4cm.  At this point you can also glue down the two end border flaps on your decorative paper.

The first pocket is made by lining up the first score line on the exterior paper and the fold of the 8cm x 9.5cm interior paper.  Keep the paper folded and bring the top and bottom flaps over and glue down.  The top and bottom flaps can be glued down 3/4 of the way across the length of the wallet.  But be sure to leave the last quarter of the flap free at this point.

Folding the outer flaps over the interior

Folding the outer flaps over the interior

Fold the section over and paste down… sandwiching the tabs in.  This is the first pocket completed!

First pocket completed

First pocket completed


Positioning and gluing in the accordion pocket sides

Positioning and gluing in the accordion pocket sides

The next step is to build the interior accordion pocket.  Fold the two small decorative pieces into quarters, making a zig-zag shape.  Position the pieces straddling the folds of the interior paper and glue into place.

Sandwiching the flaps between the folds of the interior paper

Sandwiching the flaps between the folds of the interior paper

Next you can glue down the front flap, trapping the folded edge of the decorative paper inside.  The accordion pocket insert is now complete!

Accordion pocket complete

Accordion pocket complete


Lining up the score lines and gluing under the outer flaps

Lining up the score lines and gluing under the outer flaps

To finish assembling the paper wallet, line up the fold of the small flap with the pre-scored line on the outer paper.  Just like we did on the first pocket, line up folded, bring the top and bottom border flaps over and glue everything down.

Fold over to glue down

Fold over to glue down

Fold over and glue down, sandwiching all the tabs of the decorative paper between the solid paper.

The last step is to fold over once more, tucking the small overlap inside the first pocket.  Make sure everything is pasted together well.  It is a good idea to place your wallet under some heavy books or other weights to keep in from warping while all the glue dries.

Tucking the end into the first pocket and gluing down

Tucking the end into the first pocket and gluing down

Your paper wallet is complete!  Enjoy!

For the wallet I made in the photos I used Katazome-Shi decorative paper and Moriki Kozo solid colour paper, they can both be found in The Paper Place online shop.

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Window Exhibit at The Paper Place

Friday, June 4th, 2010

Sea Forms, 2010
Heather Marchand
www.heathermarchand.com

June is Washi’s 1400th Birthday! In celebration, our window exhibit this month displays spectacular Jelly Fish, Nautilus and Sea Anemones made from Washi paper. A definite must-see in person! Sea Forms will be on display at The Paper Place for the month of June.

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Click images to see up close!

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