Posts Tagged ‘paper cutting’

Paper Covered Nightstand

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

Hi all! This week, I decided to tackle one of those I’ve-been-meaning-to-get-around-to-it-for-ages projects that has been plaguing our apartment for the 3 years we’ve lived there.

We all have pieces of furniture that we inherited when we were students, or got from that friend of a friend and just never got rid of. For my boyfriend and I, it was our nightstands…

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These very boring, very scratched, very faded nightstands have floated around with us every time we’ve moved, and are currently occupying space on either side of the bed. They add nothing to the room, and it’s high time these babies got some serious DIY love.

I’m not a huge fan of painting furniture. I am an inherently messy person (a.k.a. there’s always paint everywhere) and the paint never ends up looking as good as I want it to. Enter the beautiful black and white Scalloped Nepalese Paper (only $5.00 for a 20×30 sheet!).

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 Both my boyfriend and I love this patterned paper, and I’ve been looking for a use for it ever since I purchased it, and I thought this would be the perfect opportunity. And so we arrive at the title “Paper Covered Nightstand”.

This DIY is relatively simple and quick (it only took me 2 hours) and requires minimal equipment:

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-Screwdriver
-Patterned Paper (enough to cover the surface area of the doors and drawer faces)
-Xacto Knife
-Large Cutting Mat (not pictured)
-Neutral PH Adhesive or PVA glue (available in store for $11.95)
-Glue Brush (only $1.50 in store!)
-Bone folder (also available in store for $9.95)

Step 1:
Use the screwdriver to remove the doors and drawer faces of your nightstand. Give them a wipe with some warm soapy water to give the paper a clean surface to stick to, and dry them thoroughly.

Step 2:
Using your Xacto, trim the first sheet of paper around your door, leaving about 2″ of overhang (if you have very thick doors, you might need more overhang and thinner doors will need less).

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Step 3: Pour the glue directly onto the surface of the door (this will prevent it from drying too quickly) and spread it with the brush to coat the surface evenly. Making sure the paper’s pattern is lined up straight, lay it down on the door, and press down firmly. Hold the bone folder sideways and use it to smooth out any creases or air bubbles that form.

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Step 4: Lift up the edges of your paper and add glue to any areas you may have missed, then go over the edges with the bone folder to make sure they’re firmly glued down. If your door has a beveled detail, like mine does, run the bone folder along the bevel so the paper sits flush in the crease.

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Step 5: Poke a screw or the screw driver through any holes you need for hardware. It is important to do this while the glue is wet because it will plasticize when it dries and fill the hole, and you don’t want to have to drill a new one.

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Step 6: Carefully flip the door over so that you are now looking at the inside and the 2″ paper overhang. With the Xacto knife, make two cuts at the paper’s corner, one straight and one diagonally, to create a right triangle. Do the same thing to the adjacent corner, making sure the triangles mirror each other (the 2 straight edges should be paralell). Repeat the process on the other side of the door, and when you’re done, you should have 2 straight flaps, and 2 trapezoidal flaps (see below).

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Step 7: Brush glue onto the edge of the door adjacent to one of the trapezoidal flaps, and carefully fold the flap over, going over the edge with the bone folder. Lift the paper and glue down any sections you missed. Repeat this process on the opposite edge. If you get glue on part of the door that’s not covered by paper, don’t worry! Just wipe it with some warm water while its still wet.

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Step 8: Brush glue to the edge of the door below one of the overhanging corners. Carefully tuck the edge of the corner in on itself, then cover it with the remaining paper (see below). This process gives you a neat, hospital corner, and guarantees that no white will peak through your paper. Repeat this step on all 4 corners.

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Step 9: Apply glue to one of the remaining edges and fold over the rectangular flap, going over the edge with your bone folder. Lift the paper and apply glue to any spots you missed, pressing down firmly, and wiping any excess glue with warm water. Repeat the process on the last remaining edge.

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Step 10: With your knife and screwdriver, carefully cut and poke the holes needed for your hardware while the glue is still wet. When you’re done, set this door aside to dry, and repeat steps 1-10 on the remaining door and drawer faces.

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When you’re finished and all the pieces have dried, put the hardware back on and reattach them to the body of your nightstand. Now it’s time to stand back and admire your handiwork!

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I’m super happy with how this project turned out. My only problem now is restraining myself from covering every piece of furniture in our apartment! It’s very addicting…

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Good luck with all your paper DIYs!

Cheers!
Emma

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Mesmerizing Paper Cuts

Friday, July 4th, 2014

Recently, I came across the ever so detailed, intricate paper cuttings of Elsa Mora and fell in love.  She completes each of her imaginative paper cuts by hand with an X-Acto knife and self healing mat.

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I find the delicacy of her work very inspiring, I think the next paper project on my list is to delve into my own exploration of the craft. If you’re interested in trying your hand at paper cutting we have numerous books at the store to help get you started. Have a flip through ‘Paper Cutting’ for some inspiration-the beautiful cover is the work of Elsa Mora. 

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If you would like to see more of Elsa’s work you can visit her website at www.artisaway.com

 

Happy paper cutting!

-Abby

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Constellation Charts

Friday, June 27th, 2014

I made two Constellation Charts for a friend of mine.  They’re all the constellations that can be seen in the night sky, in Canada, in June and October.

Star ChartsI used the Sumi-e ink on the 6×8″ pieces of Etchu Hagaki for the background.  Using a Metallic Silver Sharpie I drew the oval and the Roman Numerals.  The holes were created using an awl as well as the Martha Stewart Screw Punch for the larger ones.  I then connected the dots with a pencil.

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I liked the subtle look of the pencil on the black ink.  You get a different experience close-up and far away.  I used floating frames to really let the light shine through the holes.

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Jax

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Crafting with Dresden Trims

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

Of course I had to wait until after the holidays to post photos of cards and crafts I made as gifts for Christmas this year. I’ve been really inspired by the Dresden Trims we carry in the store. Made in Germany from antique paper moulds, some of which are over 100 years old. We carry a variety of different shapes and colours of these fun paper shapes, most of them covered in gold foil. I was especially taken with the arrow and antler shapes we carry, and worked them into my holiday crafting.

I used the arrow shapes as inspiration for my cards this year. I thought I would play on the idea of seasonal fruits, I chose a pear, a clementine and an apple, and made it look as if a gold arrow had been shot through them! I used Nepalese papers and origami papers to make the fruits. I also made use of the Make Your Own Card packs we sell in the store in a variety of  sizes.

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The results were quite luxurious and rich. Paper cutting crafts can be time consuming, but using good quality tools can help. I made sure I used a self healing mat and a fresh Exacto blade when cutting papers, and I use Coccoina glue sticks for all my pasting. I used the left over Nepalese paper to make an envelope liner for the cards. A simple effective way to customize your cards even more!

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I also made a smaller simpler small gift item using the antler Dresden Trims and some of the wooden shapes we sell in the store. A wooden badge shape and the antlers, with a bit of help from a fine Le Pen, helped me make these cute, very canadian looking fridge magnets!

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These were so simple and easy to made. A dab of white glue and a stick on magnet roll is all you really need. I made a whole bunch of these and packaged them up with little tags for a cute little holiday craft that can stay on your fridge all year long!

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The store is full of little treasures that may inspire you to craft something this year. Being artistic doesn’t need to be complicated, sometimes you just need to find the right materials to work with!

Happy crafting in the New Year!

 

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Easy Silhouettes

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

I made some easy silhouettes of my boyfriend and I for our apartment.  I wanted something simple that wouldn’t contrast any of the other colours in our apartments decor.

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I got black oval frames that already had cut matting inside and painted a gold rim in the centre.

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I used Chiyogami for the background with a cut piece of Moriki Kozo for the faces.

Simple.  Easy.  Classic.

Jax

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